Sunday, September 8, 2013

Friday, September 6, 2013

ONE ROOM SCHOOLHOUSES

We still see them. They dot the rural landscape of  Ohio. But today most exist in a state of disrepair, silently crumbling beside a country road, buried in the underbrush. Some have been converted into homes, garages, township storage buildings, and grange halls. Yet their very presence evokes nostalgia for many who view them as symbols of a simpler time. “One-room schoolhouses,” according to educator Fred Schroeder, “are cherished symbols of an all but vanished lifestyle: independent, family-centered, and consciously tied to the soil.”

Uniform in design with bell towers and tall, narrow windows and often constructed of brick, these American icons are in fact third-generation structures built in the 1870s and 1880s and later. Their predecessors were generally made of logs with window openings covered with greased paper, and floors of dirt or puncheon. Others were wood-framed with clapboard siding and cedar shingles. Sadly, most of these wooden ones have long ago disappeared.

If the architectural styles of the early one-room schoolhouses varied over time, their geographic location on Ohio’s rural landscape did not. This was spelled out in the Land Ordinance of 1784 and the Northwest Ordinance of 1785. Profits from the sale or leasing of the lands of section 16 in each township of the Northwest Territory were set aside to finance public schools. But sales were slow due to the abundance of land available.

Laws establishing township school districts, inspectors, school committees, and a land valuation tax system soon remedied the situation, setting off a building boom of one-room schoolhouses across the state. So that no student would be forced to walk more than a mile, district boundaries were required to be no more than 4 square miles with the schoolhouse located near the geographic center.

Township trustees and their school committees oversaw the maintenance of the buildings, use of supplies, and expenses incurred. They kept track of the names, ages, and number of students in their districts. They hired, fired, and paid teachers as well as arranged for their room and board. All the while, they monitored the teaching abilities, character, and personal conduct of their educators.

Now there are probably only about a little over a  thousand of these buildings that still exist throughout Ohio, out of the approximate 10,000 that were originally built. A lot of the surviving ones were made into private homes, while others were transitioned into small barns. This site shows how the remainder of these schools look like today. Only the homes which still have the majority of the frame and foundation are pictured. I have only completed part of the Ohio search so far, so this site will be an ongoing process. I welcome any information which would help me provide more schoolhouses on this site.

ONE ROOM SCHOOLHOUSES

MY DEEPEST APPRECIATION GOES OUT TO THE MANY WHO HAVE HELPED ME WITH THIS ENDEAVOR. THE DOZENS OF INDIVIDUALS, LIBRARIANS, HISTORIANS, SCHOOL/HOME OCCUPANTS, MAIL PERSONS, NEIGHBORS, AND OTHERS WHO HAVE MADE THIS MORE OF A JOY THAN A CHORE. AND, GIVING ME SO MUCH VALUABLE INPUT WHICH HAS HELPED ME TREMENDOUSLY. WITH BIGGEST HATS OFF TO LARRY HELTON AND JEREMY STEVENSON.

I WOULD LIKE TO MENTION THAT ALL OF MY PHOTOGRAPHS ARE IN THE PROCESS OF BEING COPYRIGHTED. I AM WILLING TO GIVE THE RIGHTS TO NON-PROFIT HISTORICAL PROJECTS, LIBRARIES, SCHOOLS, HISTORICAL SOCIETIES. HOWEVER, IF MY PHOTOS ARE USED AS A PROFIT SOURCE, I DO EXPECT COMPENSATION.

PHOTOGRAPHER-WAYNE CHATFIELD (wynpatriot953@aol.com)

EVERY HOUSE THAT IS POSTED IS COMPRISED OF THE VAST MAJORITY OF THE ORIGINAL SCHOOL,WHICH IS PERSONALLY VERIFIED. ALTHOUGH THEY HAVE HAD SIDING ADDED IN SOME CASES, THEY HAVE KEPT THE ORIGINAL STRUCTURE UNDERNEATH OF IT. EVERYTHING THAT IS POSTED IS TRULY WHAT CONSISTS OF ALMOST ALL OF THE ORIGINAL SCHOOL HOUSE. THERE ARE AN OCCASSIONAL 2 ROOM SCHOOLHOUSES POSTED BECAUSE OF THE UNKNOWN ORIGINAL STATUS.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS BLOG IS ONLY CAPABLE OF HAVING SO MANY SCHOOLS POSTED ON THE FIRST PAGE. THERE ARE NOW OVER 800 SCHOOLS ON THIS BLOG. TO SEE ALL SCHOOLS, YOU MUST SCROLL DOWN AT THE BOTTOM AND CLICK ON OLDER POSTS. AT SOME POINT IN THE FUTURE THEY WILL BE ALL ORGANIZED BY COUNTY AND TOWNSHIP, BUT AT THE PRESENT TIME, ON THIS PARTICULAR BLOG THERE IS NOT ANY ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTIES OR TOWNSHIPS, THE SCHOOLS ARE JUST IN THE ORDER THAT I HAVE COME ACROSS THEM. SO, TO SEE ALL THE SCHOOLHOUSES FOR A COUNTY YOU WILL HAVE TO SEARCH THROUGHOUT THE BLOG. 

COVERED BRIDGES AND OTHER STRUCTURES FROM THE ONE ROOM SCHOOLHOUSE ERA HAVE BEEN ADDED DUE TO THE FACT THAT THESE WOULD BE A PART OF THE LIFE OF THE STUDENTS WHO WENT TO THESE SCHOOLS.

AND, MOST IMPORTANT..., IF ANY READER KNOWS ABOUT OTHER SCHOOLHOUSES, PLEASE CONTACT ME AND LET ME KNOW ABOUT THEM.

AND........ TO ENLARGE PICTURES FOR BETTER VIEW, JUST CLICK ON THEM.

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

SCHOOL/MARION COUNTY



 
 
SALT ROCK TOWNSHIP
 

EGYPT SCHOOL/MARION COUNTY



 
 
SALT ROCK TOWNSHIP # 3
 

PRESIDENT HARDING'S TOMB/MARION COUNTY



 
 
MARION, OHIO
 
MARION TOWNSHIP
 

PRESIDENT HARDING'S HOME/MARION COUNTY



 
 
 
MARION, OHIO
 
MARION TOWNSHIP
 

SCHOOL #1/MARION COUNTY


 
 
TULLY TOWNSHIP # 1
 

SCHOOL # 4/MARION COUNTY



 
 
GRAND PRAIRIE TOWNSHIP # 4
 

SCHOOL # 5/MARION COUNTY



 
MARION TOWNSHIP # 5
 

SCHOOL #11/MARION COUNTY


 
 
CLARIDON TOWNSHIP # 11
 

SCHOOL #10/MARION COUNTY



 
 
CLARIDON TOWNSHIP # 10
 

SCHOOL #3/MARION COUNTY


 
 
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP # 3
 

SCHOOL #1/MARION COUNTY



 
 
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP # 1
 

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Tuesday, July 23, 2013